Das Urpflanze Haus

In what is, by now, a very old Wired blurb, you can read about Stoner Age artist and alien implant conspiracist Paul Laffoley, apparently a trained architect, who has proposed "genetically engineered seeds as a solution to the housing shortage."
The seeds, you see, would grow into plants, and those plants themselves would grow into the shapes of inhabitable buildings. They would actually be buildings. Imagine a rather light-headed Michael Crichton watching *Swiss Family Robinson* on DVD when Rem Koolhaas stops by – and you'd get what Paul Laffoley has named das Urpflanze Haus, or "the primordial plant house."


[Image: the Urpflanze Haus... so small you can barely see it, however.]
You'd plant the seeds – or perhaps just one, like a new, Piranesian "Jack and the Beanstalk" – do some watering, perhaps spread a little fertilizer... and at some point your own house will grow.
Thomas De Quincey: "With the same power of endless growth and self-reproduction did my architecture proceed in dreams."
But what then? Do you prune excess or unwanted rooms? Can you graft new floorplans into the tree's genetic code?
And will you get sap all over your FCUKing clothes?
Instead of topiary gardens, rich feudal warlords of the somewhat immediate future, with coked-up guards patrolling razorwire perimeters holding AK-47s and driving stolen Humvees, will cultivate delicate architectural gardens full of intertwined Urpflanze Häusen, on well-watered terraces stretching off past the conflict-laden, desert horizon. The world's eventual oldest living house will be planted by a fourteen year-old girl in the hills of Missouri, out-living the Anthropocene by uncountable hundreds of years.
"Laffoley's portfolio," Wired continues, which "includ[es] a human-powered vehicle and a time machine, echoes the weird science of Nikola Tesla and Buckminster Fuller: Intricate illustrations and collages graft ancient occultism, eccentric engineering, particle physics, and a dose of ufology onto obsessively detailed building plans for a surreal alternative future."

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1 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hi! love your page - i noticed mention of Paul Laffoley's Plant-architecture idea. I have osme larger versions of that image in the Paul Laffoley section on my site. He actually has many other ideas of equal insight and creativity.
http://www.miqel.com/visionary_art/paul_laffoley_intro.html

April 16, 2006 12:47 AM  

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