London Future Green

Note: This is a guest post by Nicola Twilley.

During a brief Tube journey earlier today, this image stood out against a backdrop of mobile phone advertisements, travel insurance offers, and posters for English-language schools.

[Image: "Above Ground" by Nils Norman, commissioned by Platform for Art for Transport for London; view it as a 2.6MB PDF].

Designed by artist and architect Nils Norman, this fantasy map traces the Piccadilly line's route through an alternate London whose landmarks consist of utopian eco-fantasies (mushroom farms and geothermal energy platforms) alongside various post-war avant-garde architects' unrealized projects for the city.

Mike Webb's Sin Centre and Cedric Price's Fun Palace sit next to the Westminster Bog and Wetland Chain, while Thomas Affleck Greeves' Monument to Commemorate the Passing of the Good Old Days of Architecture nestles in the shadow of a dual purpose algae factory and housing tower not far from George Orwell's Ministries of Love, Peace and Plenty. The result is an interesting juxtaposition of hypothetical projects designed as critique or provocation, and equally imaginary proposals rooted in a utopian impulse toward sustainability: Superstudio's Continuous Monument is set alongside the North London Turbine Fields and the South Kensington Vegetable Oil Refinery.

It turns out that the map dates from summer 2007, and was part of a year-long celebration of the Piccadilly line's centenary. Transport for London commissioned multiple public art projects to mark the occasion, under the curatorial title "Thin Cities"—a reference to Italo Calvino's invisible city of Armilla, in which a "forest of pipes... rise[s] vertically where the houses should be and spread[s] out horizontally where the floors should be." This striking description highlights the Tube's structural centrality to London—even if Calvino's "underground veins" carry water, not commuters or tourists.

Other projects from the series include the first ever whole-Tube wrap, as well as the calls of fifty-two different migratory species (one per week) broadcast every twenty minutes over the Knightsbridge station tannoy. Taken from the British Library's sound archive, these included the clicks of a bottle-nosed dolphin and the honks of a Whooper swan—and they were each introduced by the official voice of the Tube, Emma Clarke.

All the Thin Cities projects are now archived online; they're presented alongside photos and anecdotes from each station on the Piccadilly line, such as the best place to watch planes take off and land at Heathrow (hint: it's a small footbridge outside Hatton Cross) and the fate of Alfie the cat (he was adopted by a Station Supervisor after 10 years' independent living at Cockfosters).

[Check out Archinect's interview with Nils Norman for more. Also vaguely related: Just Add Water. Previous posts by Nicola Twilley include Atmospheric Intoxication, Park Stories, and Zones of Exclusion].

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3 Comments:

Anonymous Paul Graham Raven said...

I wonder if the people who commissioned the poster realised that the mushrooms bottom left are a very particular sort of mushroom, as evinced by their shape - those are Liberty Caps, better known as Magic Mushrooms... :)

May 25, 2009 3:46 PM  
Blogger Clare Dudman said...

Fascinating stuff - I've never come across this before. I shall look out for it next time I'm in the Tube.

May 25, 2009 4:50 PM  
Blogger Simon said...

Oh. I just left London and caught the Piccadilly line to Heathrow. I was staring at this poster the whole journey. It's great! I remember thinking about those mushrooms too :)

June 01, 2009 8:19 PM  

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