Working the Line

Tomorrow night in Los Angeles, at the Center for Land Use Interpretation, David Taylor will be presenting his project "Working the Line."

[Image: U.S./Mexico border marker #184; photograph by David Taylor].

Taylor has been documenting "276 obelisks, installed between the years 1892 and 1895, that mark the U.S./Mexico boundary from El Paso/Juarez to San Diego/Tijuana. He will present this work, and describe his experiences along this often remote and dramatic linear and liminal space."

As geographer Michael Dear—who spoke about border issues back at Postopolis! LA—describes these obelisks:
    The monuments erected by the boundary survey played a pivotal role in securing the line after the Mexican-American War. These obelisks and stone mounds literally marked on the ground the southernmost edges of the nation; they became fundamental points of reference in subsequent boundary disputes (of which there were many) and in the resurvey of the border that took place at the end of the 19th century.
In the context of Taylor's project, it's interesting to read a 2006 discussion about "GeoCaching the Mexican Border Obelisk Monuments," in which a project nearly identical to Taylor's was presented as "extreme & dangerous," and thus all but impossible to achieve. Rhetorically speaking, I also want to point out CLUI's use of the terms "remote and dramatic" to describe what the geocaching site sees as "extreme & dangerous"—an intriguing insight into the spirit of the two approaches. In any case, the ensuing conversation there includes fascinating technical details of the obelisks themselves—their materiality and scale—as well as precise coordinate locations for several dozen of them.

The talk kicks off at 7pm, on Wednesday, August 4, at CLUI's gallery space in Culver City; here's a map.

(Random book link: Obelisk: A History).

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2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ramirez's essay is titled "The 98th Meridian". There is, of course, no 98th parallel, as they stop at 90°N and 90°S.

August 14, 2012 7:28 PM  
Blogger Geoff Manaugh said...

Anon, the essay was originally titled "The 98th Parallel," as you can see both in the URL of the link and in the comments left after that blog post. But thanks for the heads up!

August 16, 2012 10:54 PM  

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