Cathedral Scan

Artist Blake Carrington turns Gothic cathedrals into sound.


As Carrington explains it, his project Cathedral Scan—which will be performed live on Thursday, March 3, in the basilica of St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in New York City—"translates the architectural plans of Gothic cathedrals into open-ended musical scores via custom software. Treating the plans as a kind of map, in the live performance Carrington navigates through them to create diverse rhythms, drones and textures."
    Groups of scanners filling the sonic spectrum may act in synch, forming a single harmonically-dense rhythm, or they may scan the plans at different speeds, resulting in complex polyrhythms. Each plan is treated as a modular score, with a distinct rhythm and timbre of its own. Also, by varying the speed and intensity of each scanning group, drone-like sounds may emerge based on the “resonant frequency” of the black and white plan.
Coming out later this month, March 2011, is an album version, on which Carrington's work is "edited from a live concert in a large church space, and combines the direct signal created in software with the immense natural reverberation of the performance space."

The video embedded above consists only of the "direct signal"—that is, "without spatial acoustics"—recorded during a concert in Montréal back in October 2009.



Of course, it's difficult not to wonder what this might sound like applied to radically other architectural styles and structural types, from, say, the Seagram Building or the Forth Bridge to troglodyte homes in Cappadocia. Further, it would be interesting to see this applied not just to plans or sections—not just to architectural representations—but to three-dimensional structures in real-time. Laser scans of old ruins turned from visual information to live sound, broadcast 24 hours a day on dedicated radio stations installed amidst the fallen walls of old temples, or acoustically rediscovering every frequency at which Mayan subwoofers once roared.

If you're in NYC, be sure to check out Carrington's concert.

(Thanks to Christophe Guignard, Sublamp, and Blake Carrington for the tip! Earlier: Listening to a machine made entirely from windows)

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Blogger Rohn said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

March 01, 2011 11:40 AM  
Blogger Rohn said...

Reverse the idea with an algorithm that converts musical compositions into building designs. The high-speed rail station implied by "Rhapsody in Blue" or the condominium development suggested by "This Must Be the Place." The skyline made from Kind of Blue.

March 01, 2011 11:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I designed a Roman facade in college based off a Barenaked Ladies song.

March 01, 2011 6:24 PM  
Blogger Morgan said...

This is just so amazing. I wish I could hear it live. I love the idea of the marriage of sound, architecture and code.

March 10, 2011 6:27 PM  

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