Branch

[Image: From "Means to an End" by Dillon Marsh].

There are a few projects by the young South African photographer Dillon Marsh that seem worth a look.

[Image: From "Means to an End" by Dillon Marsh].

The first are his photos of "electricity pylons... criss-crossing the landscape around the city of Cape Town," called "Means to an End."

[Image: From "Means to an End" by Dillon Marsh].

Marsh is by no means the first photographer, artist, writer, architect, etc., to look at electricity pylons, but the resulting images are pretty stunning.

Meanwhile, Marsh has a variety of other series available for view on his website, but another one I want to feature briefly here is called "Limbo."

[Image: From "Limbo" by Dillon Marsh].

In Marsh's own words, "'Limbo' is a series of photographs showing trees that have died, but not yet fallen. All these trees were photographed in various suburbs of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, including Bridgetown, Bonteheuwel, Ruyterwacht, Windermere, and The Hague."

The results perhaps recall the "Rise" filter, as well as the square format of Instagram, but, for me, that doesn't take away from their visual or conceptual interest.

[Images: From "Limbo" by Dillon Marsh].

Oddly, these actually remind me of the trees in Hackney, a borough of London where I briefly lived more than a decade ago; the branches of almost every tree along the streets that I walked each morning to the local bus stop had been cut—or hacked, as it were—by the Council, apparently out of a mathematically impossible fear of liability should the branches someday fall and hit a car, a pedestrian, or a baby in a stroller, lending the neighborhood an even drearier feel of grey-skied Gothic horror than it would have had already on its own.

[Images: From "Limbo" by Dillon Marsh].

Somewhere between portraits and landscape photography, these two projects of Marsh's go well together, depicting the starkly exposed branching peculiar to these two types of structures.

They are also both in Marsh's "Landscape Series" of photographs, a series that, in his words, seeks "to find things that are out of the ordinary, picking them out of the landscape where they might otherwise blend in. I choose objects that can be found in multitude within their environment so that I can depict a family of objects in a series of photographs. By displaying each project as such, I feel I am able to show both the character of the individual members, and the characteristics that make these objects a family."

I'll do one more quick post, showing my favorite series of all.

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4 Comments:

Anonymous Rob said...

"I'll do one more quick post, showing my favorite series of all."

It had better be "Assimilation"!

March 11, 2013 10:20 PM  
Blogger Geoff Manaugh said...

Rob, speak of the Devil!

March 11, 2013 10:40 PM  
Blogger David T.H. Loring said...

In northern california, where I grew up, a similar fear of falling branches caused some homeowners to top and limb the beautiful redwood trees that grew near their houses, leaving bare reddish-brown trunks sticking straight up like outsized telephone poles up above their houses.

March 11, 2013 11:11 PM  
Blogger ed said...

Kind of riffing on both these posts: I found this interesting tree trimming job in the town of Rural, WI:

http://www.pbase.com/edhahn/image/95312760/original.jpg

ed

March 12, 2013 7:50 AM  

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