Teenage Mutant Ninja District

Abandoned terrapin turtles purchased 25 years ago at the height of popularity for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles have been harming wildlife and changing the ecological character of England's famed Lake District. Once an orbital center for the lives of poets William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the landscape is now infested with discarded pets purchased for their imaginative resemblance to kids' toys and comic book characters.

Terry Bowes, a regional zoo director interviewed by the Guardian, has become "exasperated at the routine abandonment of creatures," he explained, "that suffered the misfortune of becoming fashionable at the time of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle craze."

"I was thinking what we could do about them all," Bowes told the paper, "and then I heard about another Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle film coming out soon and steam came out of my ears. I was thinking, 'Oh no, this is only going to get worse.'"

Human ownership of changing animal species responds to the quirks of popular appeal, we read, including hit films and toy lines: "Pets are just as vulnerable to fashion as anything else, said Bowes, as we passed three enormous European eagle owls he said were abandoned by their owners after they outgrew Harry Potter, and a trio of perky meerkats he said were probably originally bought after seeing the star of the Compare the Market insurance ads." The region is an open-air zoo of animals that have escaped from popular media.

Surely, though, in a sense, this is just the latest, albeit inadvertent iteration of the infamous American Acclimatization Society, a group of literary-minded naturalists in 19th-century New York City who made it their bizarre goal to "introduce to the U.S. every bird mentioned in Shakespeare’s scripts." As Scientific American writes, "The Acclimatization Society released some hundred starlings in New York City’s Central Park in 1890 and 1891. By 1950 starlings could be found coast to coast, north past Hudson Bay and south into Mexico. Their North American numbers today top 200 million." Shakespeare, the Bible, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles—all cultural artifacts and unintended animal blueprints for infested landscapes yet to come.

(The recent documentary The Elephant in the Living Room is worth a view here, for anyone interested in the unforeseen—or, far more often, willfully overlooked—negative side-effects of exotic pets).

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1 Comments:

Anonymous The World Archive said...

Japanese knotweed introduced in the UK by the Victorians is having a similarly devastating effect and costing millions every year to remove.

August 12, 2013 11:25 AM  

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