Comparative Astral Isochrones

[Image: Isochronic map of travel distances from London, from An Atlas of Economic Geography (1914) by John G. Bartholomew (via)].

"This is an isochronic map—isochrones being lines joining points accessible in the same amount of time—and it tells a story about how travel was changing," Simon Willis explains over at Intelligent Life. The map shows you how long it would take to get somewhere, embarking from London:
You can get anywhere in the dark-pink section in the middle within five days–to the Azores in the west and the Russian city of Perm in the east. No surprises there: you’re just not going very far. Beyond that, things get a little more interesting. Within five to ten days, you can get as far as Winnipeg or the Blue Pearl of Siberia, Lake Baikal. It takes as much as 20 days to get to Tashkent, which is closer than either, or Honolulu, which is much farther away. In some places, a colour sweeps across a landmass, as pink sweeps across the eastern United States or orange across India. In others, you reach a barrier of blue not far inland, as in Africa and South America. What explains the difference? Railways.
Earlier this year, when a private spacecraft made it from the surface of the Earth to the International Space Station in less than six hours, the New York Times pointed out that "it is now quicker to go from Earth to the space station than it is to fly from New York to London."

[Image: From Twitter].

In the context of Bartholomew's map, it would be interesting to re-explore isochronal cartography in our own time, to visualize the strange spacetime we live within today, where the moon is closer than parts of Antarctica and the International Space Station is a shorter trip than flying to Heathrow.

(Map originally spotted via Francesco Sebregondi).

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Blogger Anthony said...

Well, New York to London is about 12 times further than the distance from Earth to the space station, so that's not much of a surprise.

December 04, 2015 1:35 PM  
Blogger D said...

I think I can make out the Trans-Siberian railroad?

December 06, 2015 8:05 AM  

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